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Ecumenism - Page 2

Mainline Ecumenism: It’s Older Than You Think

Words both denote and connote, which is to say that they both mean something and suggest a constellation of associated ideas, images, and feelings. Ecumenism means, simply, cooperation among Christian churches. The word connotes, however, a certain kind of cooperation

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Laudato Si’ and The Accra Confession in Conversation

14 mins read

In 2004, the World Alliance of Reformed Churches 24th General Council in Accra, Ghana, released The Accra Confession: Covenanting for Justice in the Economy and the Earth. The Accra Confession came out of more than a decade of global dialogues among leadership of Reformed churches. At their meeting in Accra,

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Ecumenical Pilgrims

14 mins read

Come Join the Journey Toward New Moral and Global Horizons As a New Yorker with no car, I walk a lot. I find myself evaluating a new pair of shoes based on the mileage I imagine clocking in them, and anytime I explore a new area of the city, figuring

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Te Deum: To Do ‘Em!

12 mins read

A New Worshiping Community Embracing (but not bound by) Denominational Affiliation “If you want to go fast, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.” -African Proverb Write Blog Article Make Drs. Appointment for Mom Plan Ministerium Meeting Set Up Petting Zoo Finish Wedding Service Pick Up Wedding

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Building Peace Ecumenically

10 mins read

Asking the Right Questions There are two fundamentally different ways to start. You can start by asking questions like, “What is the future of ecumenism in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)?” Or even “What does the future of institutionalized denominations hold?” These questions are important, but counterintuitive as it might seem,

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Adventures in the Mystical Ecumenical Microchurch

15 mins read

Denominations are a strange thing. Denominations divide us into discrete boxes of distinct doctrine but can also reflect dynamic diversity. For decades, the ecumenical movement in the United States has sought to transcend, unite, and even bypass these institutional categories to invoke a universal body of Christ. At times, that

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Snapshots of the ‘New Ecumenism’: Chaplaincy

14 mins read

A Presbyterian, a Lutheran, and two Episcopalians walk into a hospital. Not the start of a joke, I promise. Instead, it was the start of my summer working at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, OH, as a student intern in the Clinical Pastoral Education program. Clinical Pastoral Education (CPE) is

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Snapshots of the ‘New Ecumenism’: Collegiate Ministry

13 mins read

“Can I ask you a question? Hugging during the passing of the peace… is that an all-Lutherans thing or just a Lutheran Campus Ministry thing?” Of all the ecumenical worship service’s elements that were different than our usual Sunday UKirk worship (including the use of real wine rather than grape

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More Baby Than Bath Water

16 mins read

Ruminations on Institutional Ecumenism Picture this: Gathered in the headquarters of a labor union are about 40 persons who want to make it easier for ex-felons to regain the vote as part of re-entering society. The participants’ average age is about 35. Almost half are ex-felons. The rest are from

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Mainline Ecumenism: It’s Older Than You Think

14 mins read

Words both denote and connote, which is to say that they both mean something and suggest a constellation of associated ideas, images, and feelings. Ecumenism means, simply, cooperation among Christian churches. The word connotes, however, a certain kind of cooperation among a certain subset of churches. The image it brings

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What Motherhood and Ecumenism Have in Common

10 mins read

This article is reprinted from Rebecca Todd Peters’ blog at Patheos, “To Do Justice.” For original, see: http://www.patheos.com/blogs/todojustice/2015/07/06/what-motherhood-and-ecumenism-have-in-common/ “There are practical obstacles to women during intervals of pregnancy, giving birth and nursing, of which the female employees usually take extensive leave from their employment. Being occupied in priestly work may

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