Previous
Next

The Complicity of the Christian Church: The Creation of White Supremacy Ideology

European colonization of America[1] opened the door to a yet unknown continent to a part of the world. This entry into the new world led to the development of a social construction based on skin color and Europeans placed themselves on a God-ordained pyramid of humanity where they were on top, and Christ had blond hair and blue eyes. The created hierarchy developed in orchestration between business ventures and theological support from the Christian church sustained oppression for centuries. It worked hand in glove in promoting, permitting, and proselytizing white supremacy through colonization and eventually global power.

More

A Light Shined on the Capitol

Yesterday, the United States Capitol was infested with a predominately white mob of domestic terrorist fueled by hate, fear, and conspiracy. These events occurred, not by coincidence, during the Feast of Epiphany, a moment in Christian history when the light of the star above the Christ child revealed to humanity the radical love and justice that was just born. As the light of Epiphany shined over us, it morphed into spotlights that lit up scattered moments throughout this terrorist attack. s the terrorists marched to the capitol, they carried multiple signs saying, “Jesus Saves.” Some carried the ever so controversial “Christian flag.” A cross was erected in front of the Michigan state capitol.

More
  • 14 mins read

    I spent the summer of 1994 being trained as a chaplain at the largest Level I trauma hospital in Atlanta. I was twenty-three when I began the program. At that point I had only peripherally met one person who I knew was HIV-positive, and I questioned if my life experience

    More
  • 13 mins read

    In tossing a coin, the possibility of either heads or tails remain equally viable options as the coin remains suspended in midair. In this moment, there is no way to be sure which way the coin will fall. However, the moment the coin lands on heads, the possibility of its

    More
  • 14 mins read

    Before I became the Gun Violence Prevention Ministry Coordinator with the Presbyterian Peace Fellowship, I volunteered as a restorative circle facilitator at an elementary school. This elementary school was located in an area with the highest level of childhood poverty in the state and the highest level of violence in

    More
  • 5 mins read

    The Latin American community is not a single monolithic group; instead, it reflects the diversity of the continent’s colonization and is part of our past and present. Today in the United States, the Latin community demonstrates racial diversity and distinctive heritages. The native population is still strong with their traditions

    More
  • 11 mins read

    Many people have begun to head to the polls to vote. Some will wait until November 3rd to cast their votes. Today is a great time to talk about what it means to be an ally. Voting is one of the biggest ways people show their alliance and allyship. As

    More
  • 9 mins read

    I am not a radical. At least, I don’t think I am. What I am is a very mainstream pastor of a very mainstream Presbyterian congregation in Louisville, Kentucky. I know that there are many mainstream, non-radical people who are seeing news of the ongoing protests against racial injustice directed

    More
  • 14 mins read

    A lot has transpired between the Week of Action and my partaking in the Young Adult Round Table. It is 2020 and to say that so much happens in a day, in a week, is now normal. Lately it seems extra heavy and unbearable. Where I feel numb, I also

    More
  • 4 mins read

    It is far past time that people of the Christian faith show up for racial justice in our country especially since many churches and religious institutions have perpetuated racist systems. Christianity is a faith of love and justice, not one that should be tied to nationalism, tyranny, or systems of

    More
  • 11 mins read

    The story of the Canaanite woman infuriates me. Commentators and scholars, particularly male identifying ones, that focus on this woman’s persistence (which is notable) often make me wonder why we can’t hold Jesus accountable for his actions toward her? Breaking down this story we see that Jesus, after he gives

    More
  • 15 mins read

    I know you; you’re an ally. You read the books, you listen to the podcasts, and you wear the pins. I get it. (Here’s a secret — I have all the pins, too.) Recently, I was quarantine cooking and listening to the Queerology podcast, “On Performative Allyship and Black Joy,”

    More
  • 5 mins read

    As the call for racial justice for our Black siblings echoes throughout the country, it has not only hit large cities, but also small communities. Local ministry leaders are calling out racism and white supremacy within their own contexts. Jeff Moles, a Christian educator in Owensboro, Kentucky, recently submitted

    More
  • 7 mins read

    On any given Sunday morning these days, we gather around our laptops or phones, or gather in small, distant family groups in our churches’ sanctuaries to worship and to hear a word from God. In the context of our beautiful liturgical traditions, we are comforted by the familiar rhythm of

    More

Hallowed but not Sacred: An Epiphany of Capitol Violation

Moderate and progressive Christians have always found it hard to take Donald Trump seriously as a false messiah, much less an actual one. In the name of Trump, some 1000 or so extremists invaded and occupied the Senate and House chambers for several hours on January 6, prompting many Republicans and Democrats to refer to those sites as “sacred” spaces that had been desecrated by force and vandalism. For some, democracy may itself be sacred, by which they mean of highest value. The ritual of publicly counting the electoral votes from the states was thus a sworn duty that was interrupted. Such public ceremonies are important expressions of patriotism, and even a certain amount of “civil religion” can be justified. Flags and other symbols, like the Capitol building itself, share in the virtues to which they point.

More

Our Country is in the Midst of Twin Pandemics

Our country is in the midst of twin pandemics. One, the coronavirus pandemic, is dominating headlines. The other is a nationwide spike in gun violence. Gun violence is up in cities across the country. On Independence Day Weekend, violence broke out in cities nationwide, including two shootings in my hometown of Dallas that left one dead and four wounded. That local violence has tragically continued since then. Summer violence is, sadly, an American tradition. Each summer, as the temperature goes up, so do incidents of gun violence. This year, if anything, is worse than usual. In June, murder and shootings increased in Chicago and New York despite falls in other kinds of crime compared to years past.

More