Browse Tag

LGBTQQI

columbia seminary

Who Gets to Live at Columbia Seminary, and Who Doesn’t?

Columbia Theological Seminary, Georgia On April 24, 2012, I interviewed a student at Columbia Theological Seminary (CTS), who prefers to stay anonymous for ordination reasons, about the recent gay and lesbian married housing issue that has erupted on the Columbia

Keep Reading
/

Except on Palestine?

27 mins read

“I didn’t know church could be like this,” said Sam, a teenager who had come to an event in Fellowship Hall. That Sunday after worship, we had Anna Baltzer speaking about why, as a Jewish-American, she had come to be an outspoken critic of Israeli policies, part of her national

More
/

There is Such a Thing as Being Too Gentle

12 mins read

Watering down the LGBTQ/Q Apology Overture at GA222 I never thought “collateral damage” was a term I’d identify with as a church-lady. I was wrong. I was baptized as a young girl in a Presbyterian church that would become my family’s spiritual home for the next fifteen years. I remember

More
Default thumbnail
/

The Hope of Something New

12 mins read

Feminism, Evangelism, and New Worshiping Communities If you were going to create a church that fully lived into gender equality as one of the central values, what would that look like? Who would preach? What language would you use to represent God? Who would preside at the table? Who would make up

More
Default thumbnail
/

Silencing: Testimonials of the Exiled Christians

12 mins read

I’ve always loved telling my story. In college, my campus Christian group would pass out spiritual gifting inventories, and we’d take a test to help determine whether we had the gifts of prophesy, faith, teaching, healing, evangelism, service, etc. I never identified strongly with any of these gifts, so I

More
Default thumbnail
/

Re-Imagining the Church as Spiritual Institution

26 mins read

Affirming Diversity and Life-Sustaining Relationships The following article was originally published in the May/June 1994 edition of Church & Society. Download a PDF of the original here. Listen to the words of Elizabeth, an enslaved woman and minister, born in Maryland in 1766: “I betook myself to prayer and in

More
1 2 3 6