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martin luther king jr.

“Selma, Lord, Selma”

From Admiration to Action Five children (4 girls and 1 boy, who departs in the opposite direction halfway down) are walking down steps of the 16th Street Baptist Church. They are discussing typical girlish things. “I got my hair pressed

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Living History – Melva Costen

7 mins read

Music, Black Presbyterians, and Civil Rights Video used with permission from the Presbyterian Historical Society, part of the Living History film project. Melva Costen, wife of former general assembly moderator James Costen, is a retired professor of music and worship. Here she discusses her family’s involvement in the Civil Rights movement,

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“Selma, Lord, Selma”

10 mins read

From Admiration to Action Five children (4 girls and 1 boy, who departs in the opposite direction halfway down) are walking down steps of the 16th Street Baptist Church. They are discussing typical girlish things. “I got my hair pressed that morning, and it was wasted when I hit the

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Rev. Maurice "Bojangles" Blanchard and his partner, Dominique James, joined by supporters as they pray and nonviolently protest marriage inequality

My Feet Are Tired, But My Soul’s Rested

14 mins read

Rev. Bojangles Blanchard, Gay Baptist Minister, Tells the Story behind His Arrest after Applying to Marry His Partner By Rev. Maurice “Bojangles” Blanchard   I’m Rev. Bojangles Blanchard and I was arrested, along with my partner, Dominique James, for holding a peaceful sit-in after being denied a marriage application. But

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Mark Koenig

Courage: A Poem for Nonviolent Witness

3 mins read

Inspired, on the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.’s birthday, by the Palestinians, Israelis, and internationals who worked nonviolently to protect the village and olive trees of Budrus, and by all who use nonviolence to witness for justice, wholeness, and peace. By the Rev. W. Mark Koenig, Director of the

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Martin Luther King and Malcolm X

MLK Litany on the Tragedy of Gun Violence

4 mins read

Written for the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day By the Rev. W. Mark Koenig, Director of the Presbyterian Ministry at the United Nations   Banner Photo: Martin Luther King Jr. and Malcolm X, both victims of gun violence (U.S. Library of Congress)   We celebrate and give thanks

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j. herbert nelson press conference

God is Love: Statement on Gun Violence

11 mins read

Special Statement for Martin Luther King Jr.’s Birthday This statement was delivered by Reverend Dr. J. Herbert Nelson at a press conference held in Washington, DC, on January 15, 2013. Religious leaders and Faith Against Gun Violence came together to press for tighter gun regulations to stop gun violence in

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Princeton Theological Seminary

Dangerous Faith: A Mandate for Dislocation

12 mins read

Princeton Theological Seminary Getting out of our LA-Z-Boy theologizing and the safety of our blogs, and into the dangerous terrain of taking action, encountering otherness, and altering our perceptions of reality—dangerous precisely for its capacity to transform us, society, and the church. By Daniel Yang   View and print as

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Kelly Jean Norris-Wilke, Pittsburgh Theological Seminary student
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What an Urban Seminary Is Doing to Advocate Social Justice Beyond the Iron Gates

11 mins read

Pittsburgh Theological Seminary One Seminarian’s Perspective By Kelly Jean Norris-Wilke   View and print as PDF.   I am standing on pavement covered in graffiti. Letters from friends and loved ones spray-painted onto the black top. Letters saying goodbye to a seventeen-year-old community member shot on this spot on a

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photo of civil rights leaders, including Dr. King, meeting with Lyndon Johnson

Why I Am Still a Christian

7 mins read

By Gary Dorrien   (The following is an autobiographical reflection from social ethicist, Gary Dorrien, also appearing in “On Living Faith” series offered by Odyssey Networks, and previewed by Unbound on ecclesio.com. Looking back to the Civil Rights Movement and Dr. King, Gary Dorrien offers a few thoughts on what

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